October 11, 2018
Deal Watch Today

No bids for CT's Hartford skyscraper

Photo | contributed
Photo | contributed
The 15-story midtown tower at 25 Sigourney St. in Hartford

The state's mid-September bid deadline for its vacant, high-rise office tower overlooking the downtown I-84 viaduct came and went with no suitable offer in hand, officials say.

Jeffrey Beckham, senior official with the state Department of Administrative Services, which manages state assets, confirmed Thursday the building remains unsold and no new bid-price deadline has been set beyond the earlier Sept. 14 deadline.

Beckham declined to say whether offers were received or what prices were offered. He said no new pre-sales terms or conditions have been imposed on the building.

The Hartford Courant was first Thursday to report the no-sale of the tower 25 Sigourney St., at the corner of Capitol Avenue.

As HBJ previously reported, the 15-story midtown tower on 2.39 acres was built in 1984 as a private office building, with 467,000 gross square feet and an attached six-story parking garage.

According to DAS, the 815-slot parking garage needs repairs, mainly to fix flaking, peeling concrete and exposed rebar that resulted from years of water leaks and airborne corrosion. Leaky windows also spawned damp, moldy walls and odors that prompted complaints from visitors and for some state workers to seek transfers out of the building.

Not only would a sale return some revenue to state taxpayers and curb the state's annual office-maintenance budget, but it also provides the city of Hartford with an opportunity to restore a sizable commercial asset to its property-tax rolls.

In lieu of property taxes, the state annually remits to the city a fixed sum -- typically much less than what the city would collect in taxes -- covering all state-owned real and personal property within its borders.

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